Oud

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The Oud instrument is the first ancient musical instrument in the world, dated back to 3000 B.C, the first stringed instrument has moved to Europe to become the Lute and than Guitar. learn more about the Oud history at the School of Oud Online as well you can read more about the Oud from

The oud (/d/) is a pear-shaped stringed instrument with 11 or 13 strings grouped in 5 or 6 courses, commonly used in PersianArabicGreekTurkishJewishByzantineAzerbaijaniArmenianNorth African (Chaabi, Classical, and Spanish Andalusian), Somali and Middle Eastern music.

Construction of the oud is similar to that of the lute.[1] The modern oud and the European lute both descend from a common ancestor via diverging paths. One instrument that has been suggested as ancestral is the barbat.[2] The oud is readily distinguished from the lute by its lack of frets and smaller neck. Alongside the lute, it is considered an ancestor of the guitar.[3] The oldest surviving oud is thought to be in Brussels, at the Museum of Musical Instruments.[4] 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oud

Arabic Maqams on the Oud

All about the Oud, Ud Lute instrument

Oud lessons - Online Oud lessons

 What is the Maqam in music?

Jins, Maqam, Fasil, what does it mean? 

The smallest unit in Arabic theory is the jins (plural ajinas), which is the Arabic interpretation of the Greek tetrachord. The word tetrachord comes from tetra- (four) and chord (group of notes). Arabic ajinas may alternately have three or five tones (trichords and pentachords). Even the same jins can be said to have three, four, or five tones, though this nuance of understanding is left to individual practise without consensus.

Two ajinas can come together to form a maqam (plural maqammat), which corresponds closely to the Greek concept of a mode. In addition to the two central ajinas, a maqam has other ajinas above and below its primary register. Unlike Western classical modes, maqamat are not restricted to an octave, nor need a mode ascend up to its octave. Several maqamat only span a sixth and are considered complete scales.

Maqamat are further grouped into families for classification. A family is a fasil (plural fasilah). Different teachers and theorists group the fasilah differently, but most agreeing on between 7-10 families of maqam. In composition and improvisation, performers may modulate within the fasil, but only rarely modulate outside.

Maqam Nahawand on the Oud - image by the school of oud online    Image of Maqam Rast Do - image by the school of oud online

 

Fasil Associations: Each family evokes particular moods in its listeners. While these moods are generally considered subjective, the moods are considered objective in the roots of the musical culture. Arabic theory developed under the influence of Persian culture, which itself was based in North Indian philosophy. North Indian classical music considers each raga (the rough equivalent of mode or maqam) to be a deity with specific attributes. Each raga is associated with a specific time of day, season or month of the year, forces of nature, and a specific human mood. Rather than the subjective associations of Western music, North Indian music teaches these associations objectively. Arabic music stands in between, admitting subjectivity but also emanating from a distinctly objective tradition.

 

Here are some of the most typical traditional fasil associations in Arabic music:

 

Maqam “Ajem” gives us feelings of  strength, majestic, cheerful; used frequently in national anthems.
Maqam “Rast” gives us feelings of masculine love, pride, power, sound mind; used frequently in religious music.  

Maqam “Nahawand” gives us feelings of  drama, emotional extremes.

Maqam “Nawa Athar” gives us feelings of  mysticism; Nawa Athar is often considered an extension of Fasil Hijaz in its mood. 

Maqam “Bayat” gives us feelings of feminine love, joy, vitality.

Maqam“Kurd” gives us feelings of freedom, romance, gentleness; Kurd is often considered part of Bayyati in its mood.

Maqam “Hijaz” gives us feelings of the desert, solitude, enchantment, mysticism

Maqam “Saba” gives us feelings of sadness, pain

Maqam “Sika” gives us feelings of old days, ancient and religion songs

 

Video Examples of The Maqamat On The Oud 

 

1- A Sense of Victory – Maqam Hijaz Kar Kord 

2- Alexandria – Maqam Hijazz  
3- Mohamed Abd El-wahab Music – Maqam Nahawand 
4- Nozha – Maqam Ajam 
5- Spiritual Egyptian Music – Maqam Hwzam 
6- Naseer Shamma Music – Hijaz Kar 

oud instrument definition

All about the Oud, Ud Lute instrument

The Definition of The Oud Instrument

Oud instrument

The Oud instrument is considered as the first stringed instrument in music history. Started with only two strings, then developed to three, then five strings that live till now since the days of Lamech, sixth-generations after ADEM!!

According to El-Farabee, the Oud dates back to the days of Lamech; a sixth-generation descendant of Adam. Lamech was known as the “Father of the Oud players”.  The first appearance of the Oud was 3000 BC. The desecrated skeleton suggested the form of the Oud.  Oud is known as the first stringed instrument in history.

The oldest pictorial record of an Oud dates back to the Uruk period in Southern Mesopotamia (Iraq), over 5000 years ago on a cylinder seal acquired by Dr. Dominique Collon and the seal is currently housed at the British Museum.

 

 

 

Ramy Adly “All about the Oud”. WASHINGTON POST interview

Newspaper

Following his early oud lessons, Adly relates, he studied intensively at the Arabic Oud House, a music school in Cairo, while pursuing a business degree at Assiut University, in his home town. He later worked as a music lecturer.

Also on Adly’s résumé: a busy teaching regimen via Skype. His School of Oud Online has reached fledgling players in at least 27 countries, including Norway, he says. Now that he is living in the Washington area, he dreams of founding a brick-and-mortar oud school.

“I’d love to add this instrument to American history,” he says.

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Oud Legend Ramy Adly comes to Kennedy Center – Washington Report

Newspaper

On Aug. 28, noted oud player Ramy Adly appeared on the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage in Washington, DC. The purpose of his performance was “to introduce the West to the oud” and to the beautiful sounds of this 4,000-year-old instrument. To showcase the oud for an American audience, Adly even performed a rendition of “Amazing Grace,” which while beautiful, felt slightly forced. He excelled most in musical styles for which the oud is most known, but the range of styles he was able to showcase can be viewed as an invitation to incorporate the oud into genres that may overlook the versatility of this ancient stringed instrument.

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Radio Sawa

Radio

This interview talks about Ramy Adly’s concert at the Kennedy Center. Radio Sawa interviewed Adly on his project, as one of the best musical projects of the Oud instrument in the world and talks about his band and his compositions. Ramy Adly released his album, “Mirage” at the concert.

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Arab League Commemorates Oud performance – PR.News

Newspaper

This year’s event was attended by 600 guests, represented officials from the World Bank, Congress, U.S. Department of State, diplomats and Arab-American communities and organizations. While enjoying Egyptian oud player and composer Ramy Adly and international Syrian Opera singer Lubana Al Quntar mesmerized the crowd with music and song.

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Radio Arabology

Radio

Dr.Ramzi Salti talks to Ramy Adly and his musical talents featuring his song, “Alexandria,” of Solo Oud.

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People You Meet

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Ramy Adly Kennedy Center Concert Photos

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Ramy Adly – Concert Photos

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